Software developer, racing fan
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Macroeconomic Changes Have Made It Impossible for Me to Want to Pay You

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“Google announced plans to lay off 12,000 people from its workforce Friday, while Microsoft said Wednesday that it’s letting go of 10,000 employees. Amazon also began a fresh round of job cuts that are expected to eliminate more than 18,000 employees and become the largest workforce reduction in the e-retailer’s 28-year history.” — CNBC, 1/18/23

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Team,

There’s no easy way to say this: I have made the difficult decision to lay off over six thousand of you. In the past two years, we have achieved huge wins together. But unfortunately, the macroeconomic environment has shifted in ways none of us could have foreseen, from an economy in which I did feel like paying you, to one in which I’d rather not.

In 2021, things looked different. Interest rates were low, and my enthusiasm for bankrolling your children’s insulin was high. Given every available forecast, it was the perfect time to hire 1,200 blockchain developers, spin up original streaming content, and lead three rounds of funding for my nephew’s AI-powered B2B sourdough recipe app. Who could have known that in just a few months, despite all our operational velocity, the world would pivot so dramatically? Supply chains have stalled. Inflation has risen. And suddenly all your salaries and dental work hang like millstones chafing the supple neck of my stock compensation package.

I wish this weren’t the case. But we cannot avoid the externalities of today’s market, which is influenced by complicated global factors like the collapse of Chinese real estate, the war in Ukraine, and my desire for a marble kitchen island with a waterfall edge. As we all know, our competitors are relentless. Even as we speak, they’re streamlining, optimizing, and booking the best contractors in the Bay Area for the next eighteen months. If I could want to pay you, I would. I just simply can’t.

This was not an easy decision to make. It’s weighed heavily on me for the past month, keeping me up at night and nearly causing me to cancel the exec team’s offsite, even though Bad Bunny’s appearance fee was only 50 percent refundable. Let’s not mince words, though; the accountability for this decision rests with me. The consequences, on the other hand, rest with you, but so does a pretty generous COBRA package.

Ultimately, this decision was made out of an abundance of confidence in our mission and all the work you’ve put into it. The fact is, our fundamentals are sound. Our revenue is growing. Our cash reserves are high. We are not going anywhere (except for six thousand of you, but you’ll be going there with a free login for our talent hub). The fact is, if I wanted to pay you, I could. I could even give you raises. But once again, that is not the economic reality we face. And so we must make hard choices.

For those of you we are losing, I’d like to say thank you for all the work you have given us, but there’s a good chance you’ve already been locked out of your computer before this email arrived.

For those of you who are staying, I look forward to touching base at the town hall next week (forgive the early start time as I’m dialing in from Cinque Terre). In the meantime, please take a moment to reflect, refocus, and visualize the bright future ahead: one in which we double down on executional excellence, and I feel interested in paying you again.

Shout with questions,
Mike

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vitormazzi
5 days ago
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Brasil
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The Shit Show

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Well, it happened.

We knew it was coming.

A prick pulled the plug. And what bothers me most about it is how Space Karen did it.

My mom passed away just before Christmas. Her decline was something everyone in the family saw coming and we prepared for her demise. It still hurts like hell, but she left with love and dignity. That makes all the difference when it comes to coping with loss.

Twitterrific is something that we’ve all poured our love into for the past 16 years. I’m not usually one to toot my own horn, but we literally crafted the early experience on the service. We often hear that folks joined up because of our app. Our work was definitive and groundbreaking. We loved this app like I loved my mom.

(Note today’s date and the one on our announcement – the fuckwads missed our 16th anniversary by a couple of days! King Shithead probably thought Friday the 13th was lol. I’d love some proof that the API went down at 04:20 in UTC +1.)

Like my mom, the API has been declining for awhile. Endpoints were removed, new features were unavailable to third parties, and rate limiting restricted what we could do. And like my mom, we struggled on and did the best we could, trying to stay upbeat about it all.

What bothers me about Twitterrific’s final day is that it was not dignified. There was no advance notice for its creators, customers just got a weird error, and no one is explaining what’s going on. We had no chance to thank customers who have been with us for over a decade. Instead, it’s just another scene in their ongoing shit show.

But I guess that’s what you should expect from a shitty person.

Personally, I’m done. And with a vengeance.

First, arrogant bastards love seeing their names on tweets and other media. I want to starve him of the things that money can’t buy: respect and attention. Do the same by simply ignoring him and his kingdom.

Secondly, for the past several months I’ve been thinking about where we go from here. When you see decline, you plan for a demise. It was the last thing mom taught me.

I’ve been active on Mastodon since the billionaire bozo took over. And it makes me think.

One thing I’ve noticed is that everyone is going to great lengths to make something that replaces the clients we’ve known for years. That’s an excellent goal that eases a transition in the short-term, but ignores how a new open standard (ActivityPub) can be leveraged in new and different ways.

Federation exposes a lot of different data sources that you’d want to follow. Not all of these sources will be Mastodon instances: you may want to stay up-to-date with someone’s Micro.blog, or maybe another person’s Tumblr, or someone else’s photo feed. There are many apps and servers for you to choose from.

It feels like the time is right for a truly universal timeline. That notion excites me like the first time I posted XML status to an endpoint.

One thing I remember from these early days: no one had any idea what they were doing. It was all new and things like @screen_name,  #hashtags, or RT hadn’t been invented yet. Heck, we didn’t even call them “tweets” or use a bird icon at first! The best ideas came from people using the service: all of the things mentioned above grew organically from a need.

That’s where I want to be in the future. Exploring unknown territory that empowers others and adapts to the needs of a community.

There’s no sense in clinging to the personal whims of a clown leading a shit show. Especially when his circus will end up being a $44 billion version of MySpace.

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vitormazzi
20 days ago
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Brasil
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life

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image

Life. :: Banksy

* * * *

“As for myself, I swung the door open. And there was the wordless, singing world. And I ran for my life.”

  — Mary Oliver

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vitormazzi
21 days ago
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Brasil
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Chick Fil A's Edge Enterprise Architecture

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vitormazzi
24 days ago
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Brasil
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1 public comment
JayM
24 days ago
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Was passing this around to a few teams yesterday. Pretty cool.
Atlanta, GA

A Wooden Artwork Miraculously Unfurls into a Functional Desk Designed by Robert van Embricqs

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An animated gif of the designer unfolding the desk

All images courtesy of Robert van Embricqs

The surge in remote work during the last few years prompted Amsterdam-based designer Robert van Embricqs to rethink how conventional desks would impact a home’s atmosphere. He wanted to invite “the user to fold that desk away when work is over” and created a now-viral piece that seamlessly transforms from office to artwork.

Constructed with warm wood and brass hinges, the “Flow Wall Desk” features flush vertical slats that twist and unfold into a tabletop. The small piece of furniture, which can support about 40 pounds, is minimal in aesthetic and mimics organic movements as it unfurls from sleek relief to functional space.

Find the desk and other modular designs in van Embricqs’ shop, and follow his work on Instagram. (via Hyperallergic)

 

A photo of the unfolded desk with a chair

A photo of the flat desk with a chair

A photo of the unfolded desk with a chair

A photo of the unfolded desk with a chair

A detail photo of the unfolded desk with a coffee cup and book

A photo of the designer sitting at the unfolded desk

Do stories and artists like this matter to you? Become a Colossal Member today and support independent arts publishing for as little as $5 per month. The article A Wooden Artwork Miraculously Unfurls into a Functional Desk Designed by Robert van Embricqs appeared first on Colossal.

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vitormazzi
25 days ago
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Brasil
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Remote Vulnerabilities in Automobiles

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This group has found a ton of remote vulnerabilities in all sorts of automobiles.

It’s enough to make you want to buy a car that is not Internet-connected. Unfortunately, that seems to be impossible.

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vitormazzi
29 days ago
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Brasil
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1 public comment
LinuxGeek
30 days ago
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No internet connectivity for my vehicles. Maybe I'll need to look into signal blocking methods for my next vehicle.
freeAgent
29 days ago
You could probably find and disable the modem/antenna.
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