Software developer, racing fan
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Seven Years

9 Comments and 30 Shares
[hair in face] "SEVVVENNN YEEEARRRSSS"
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popular
10 hours ago
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vitormazzi
2 days ago
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Brasil
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8 public comments
chrisrosa
53 minutes ago
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😢
San Francisco, CA
rjstegbauer
1 day ago
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Touching and beautiful! One of your best.
alt_text_bot
1 day ago
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[hair in face] "SEVVVENNN YEEEARRRSSS"
ameel
2 days ago
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<3
Melbourne, Australia
MaryEllenCG
2 days ago
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::sniffle::
Greater Bostonia
kyleniemeyer
2 days ago
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😭
Corvallis, OR
marcrichter
2 days ago
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Awesome. I'm speechless.
tbd
deezil
2 days ago
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OKAY I'M CRYING AT MY DESK NOW.
Louisville, Kentucky
sfrazer
2 days ago
God damnit, Randal.
deezil
2 days ago
For those that don't know the whole story: Approximately 7 years ago (imagine that) Randall posted this on the blog https://blog.xkcd.com/2010/11/05/submarines/ and made some vague references to tough times in the comics. On in to 2011, he posted this on the blog, and things seemed to be scary but hopeful. https://blog.xkcd.com/2011/06/30/family-illness/ . He's made mention several times about it over the years inside the comics, and I really believe that "Time" was made for some express purpose as to get his emotions out. But this update seriously is making a grown 32 year old man weep openly at his desk (thankfully I have a door that closes), as I always wondered how things were. Things look good, and this makes my heart happy.

New extreme sport: Thomas the Tank Engine stunts

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It is what it says on the tin: a toy Thomas the Tank Engine doing stunts on wooden tracks. My favorite part is that the slowed-down audio makes it sound somewhat like a skateboard.

Tags: video
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gabrielgeraldo
1 day ago
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São Paulo
vitormazzi
8 days ago
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Brasil
popular
8 days ago
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awilchak
9 days ago
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A+
Brooklyn, New York
DMack
9 days ago
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wicked gnar
Victoria, BC

Earlier this fall, I attempted my first corn maze. It didn’t...

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Earlier this fall, I attempted my first corn maze. It didn’t work out very well. Early on I unknowingly cut through an area meant to be impassable and thus ended up missing the majority of the maze. Soap, as it turns out, is a much better maze-solver, taking nary a false turn as it heads inexorably to the exit. The secret to soap’s maze-solving prowess is the Marangoni effect

Soap has a lower surface tension than the milk that makes up the maze, which causes an imbalance in the forces at the surface of the liquid. That imbalance causes a flow in the direction of higher surface tension; in other words, it tends to pull the soap molecules in the direction of the highest milk concentration. But that explains why the soap moves, not how it knows the right path to take. It turns out that there’s another factor at work. Balancing gravitational forces and surface tension forces shows that the soap tends to spread toward the path with the largest surface area ahead. That’s the maze exit, so Marangoni forces pull the soap right to the way out! (Video credit: F. Temprano-Coleto et al.; research credit: F. Peaudecerf et al.)

ETA: Based on the latest research results, gravity may play less of a role than originally thought. Instead, it seems as though the soap chooses its path in part through pre-existing background levels of surfactant. As the dye advances, it compresses the background surfactant, decreasing the local surface tension until it is in equilibrium with dyed area. Because longer paths take longer to reach that equilibrium, the dye spreads preferentially toward the largest surface area. 

image
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jepler
11 days ago
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it turns out soap can solve mazes
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
vitormazzi
10 days ago
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Brasil
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sodhya: thetrippytrip: hidden figures vol. 2 🗣 Their names...

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sodhya:

thetrippytrip:

hidden figures vol. 2

🗣 Their names are Ritu Karidhal, Anuradha TK, Nandini Harinath 🗣

I’m sorry I can’t seem to find the names of other women in the picture but these 3 women were the main ones involved in the project 💖

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vitormazzi
17 days ago
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Brasil
jepler
17 days ago
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Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
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anthrem
17 days ago
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Amazing!
Illinois

Uber Data Hack

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Uber was hacked, losing data on 57 million driver and rider accounts. The company kept it quiet for over a year. The details are particularly damning:

The two hackers stole data about the company's riders and drivers ­-- including phone numbers, email addresses and names -- from a third-party server and then approached Uber and demanded $100,000 to delete their copy of the data, the employees said.

Uber acquiesced to the demands, and then went further. The company tracked down the hackers and pushed them to sign nondisclosure agreements, according to the people familiar with the matter. To further conceal the damage, Uber executives also made it appear as if the payout had been part of a "bug bounty" -- a common practice among technology companies in which they pay hackers to attack their software to test for soft spots.

And almost certainly illegal:

While it is not illegal to pay money to hackers, Uber may have violated several laws in its interaction with them.

By demanding that the hackers destroy the stolen data, Uber may have violated a Federal Trade Commission rule on breach disclosure that prohibits companies from destroying any forensic evidence in the course of their investigation.

The company may have also violated state breach disclosure laws by not disclosing the theft of Uber drivers' stolen data. If the data stolen was not encrypted, Uber would have been required by California state law to disclose that driver's license data from its drivers had been stolen in the course of the hacking.

Uber was hacked, losing data on 57 million driver and rider accounts. They kept it quiet for over a year. The details are particularly damning:

The two hackers stole data about the company's riders and drivers ­- including phone numbers, email addresses and names -­ from a third-party server and then approached Uber and demanded $100,000 to delete their copy of the data, the employees said.

Uber acquiesced to the demands, and then went further. The company tracked down the hackers and pushed them to sign nondisclosure agreements, according to the people familiar with the matter. To further conceal the damage, Uber executives also made it appear as if the payout had been part of a "bug bounty" ­- a common practice among technology companies in which they pay hackers to attack their software to test for soft spots.

And almost certainly illegal:

While it is not illegal to pay money to hackers, Uber may have violated several laws in its interaction with them.

By demanding that the hackers destroy the stolen data, Uber may have violated a Federal Trade Commission rule on breach disclosure that prohibits companies from destroying any forensic evidence in the course of their investigation.

The company may have also violated state breach disclosure laws by not disclosing the theft of Uber drivers' stolen data. If the data stolen was not encrypted, Uber would have been required by California state law to disclose that driver's license data from its drivers had been stolen in the course of the hacking.

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vitormazzi
18 days ago
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Brasil
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#1641 – Feelings

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#1641 – Feelings

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vitormazzi
28 days ago
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Brasil
luizirber
28 days ago
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Davis, CA
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